Chaotic Cancer: A Family Member’s View: Diagnosis

Please be aware that some of the content may be triggering. Please take care 💚

I introduced this series of posts in this blog post ➡️ Chaotic Cancer: A Family Member’s View: Intro. This post is about my mum’s diagnosis of cancer and some information and thoughts surrounding that.

My mum’s cancer was an incidental finding. We had no suspicions that she may have cancer. There were no obvious signs (though looking back we have picked some out). It was far off the radar. I don’t know if this made it easier or harder to deal with. I have no prior experience of anyone I know getting cancer. But it was tough.

Mum went into hospital before Christmas with an inflamed gallbladder. She had antibiotics and came home. About six weeks later at the beginning of February 2021 she had a reoccurrence of the inflamed gallbladder and so they decided to remove it in an emergency surgery. It was then that they found something. On her liver were lesions. Tumours. They took biopsies. Then we had to wait for the confirmation of cancer. They knew it was. It couldn’t be anything else. But we didn’t. So I grasped that tiny bit of hope. Hung on to it tight.

Within a week she was back for the results. It was, surprise, surprise, cancer. A rare one. Slow growing. Treatable. Neuroendocrine cancer. That’s what they told us then. There was still hope. But I dissolved. That day I sobbed for an hour. Mum was meant to be isolating after exposure to covid while on the ward but screw that, I hugged her. Then the guilt set in.

To understand this guilt means explaining that in my therapy I’d been working to stop self harming. I had been using as an OCD type compulsion to stop people getting ill. I’d been told it had no effect on them not getting ill. Then this happened. I’d made my mum get cancer. I even told my dad it was my fault. The guilt overtook me. I had ended the therapy by then ahead of a new group but all I wanted was to email the psychologist and tell her she’d made me give my mum cancer. Yup, totally irrational. Or that’s what I’m told. I bounce back and forwards still.

With the diagnosis came a lot of emotions. Emotions I didn’t understand. Emotions that were set to overwhelm me along with other people’s. So I pushed mine down. From the day after the diagnosis I didn’t cry for a long while. I threw myself into the practical. I didn’t feel anything. I totally blotted out my feelings. I had enough to overwhelm me with other people’s emotions. Those had a name though as people could tell me them. My own I can’t name.

So diagnosis was stage one of the whole cancer chaos. The start of the chaotic world it brings. And beginning it all in the midst of a pandemic has brought challenges as well. Mum was on her own for the diagnosis as at our hospital appointments have to be attended alone. I think that has hurt her a lot. I don’t know though.

So from diagnosis comes many more tests and appointments. These I will discuss in another blog post. I think I thought diagnosis would be the hardest part. How wrong I’ve been.

If you want to share any experiences, thoughts or resources feel free to use the comments or my Twitter, Facebook or Instagram accounts linked to this blog.

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