Mental Health Professionals

This is a post about the different professionals involved in my mental health care. I aim to discuss a bit about what each of them do and my relationships and experiences with them. There are many different professions in mental health care and it can be confusing to know what they do.

1. My GP – I thought I would cover this role first as its normally the first port of call for anyone struggling with their mental health. They can offer advice and medication, as well as referring you on to get help from other professionals. My GPs have on the whole been great. I see two who deal with everything and have been really supportive in getting me the right care. Sometimes it takes a while to find a good GP in the practice; the ones I see now were not the first I approached about my mental health, but keep trying as there are great GPs out there who can act as your advocate.

2. Psychiatrist – This is a doctor of the mind. Mine is involved in prescribing medication and referring me for other treatments and services, such as therapy. I have seen many different psychiatrists over the years, some great, some appalling. Getting one who listens to you and respects your opinion is amazing and can make all the difference. I currently see a different one each time I go which makes continuity of care hard.

3. Care coordinator – A care coordinator can be any mental health professional and is usually the main point of contact for support. They also sort out your care plan under the care plan approach (CPA). I’m on my second care coordinator after my first left. Neither of mine has actually really made the time to sit down with me yet and discuss my care plan. I hope this changes as I feel I need their support.

4. Support worker – These are people who support you in different ways, from being a point of contact with services to getting you involved in activities. Me and my support worker don’t always see eye to eye but she has been my regular contact with the mental health team and sees me on a weekly basis (usually, she is currently off sick) to check in with how I am doing and to trouble shoot any problems.

5. Psychologist – A psychologist is different to a psychiatrist. A psychologist offers talking therapies in order to treat mental illnesses. They have nothing to do with medication. I am currently going through the process of getting an assessment and hopefully starting therapy, and it will be my psychologist who facilitates this all. In the past when I had art therapy I had a great psychologist who really understood me and respected the way I work. I hope this will be the case again.

6. Crisis team – A crisis team is there to support you when you are particularly unwell and treat you outside of hospital. They will often see you every day for a short period of time. Although they are not currently involved in my care I thought it was important to include them as they do play an important role in keeping people safe in crisis times. I have seen them a number of times with varying responses, unfortunately not all good. Some people find them frustrating.

So there you have the professionals that are, or have been, involved in my mental health care. There are other professionals that work in mental health but I haven’t had contact with them. Please feel free to share your experiences of different professionals in the comments. It may also be different if you live outside the UK. For more information on mental health professionals check out the Mind website.

Picture from Pinterest

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